1. "

    A FAT LITTLE GIRL
    is eight years old, she’s got pink cheeks that her grandmother calls chubby. She wants a second cookie but her aunt says “you’ll get huge if you keep eating.” She wants a dress and the woman in the changing room says “she’ll probably need a large in that.” She wants to have dessert and her waiter says “After all that dinner you just had? You must be really hungry!” and her parents laugh.

    A FAT LITTLE GIRL
    is eleven and she is picked second-to-last in gym class. She watches a cartoon and sees that everyone who is annoying is drawn with a big wide body, all sweaty and panting. At night she dreams she is swelling like the ocean over seabeds. When she wakes up, she skips school.

    A FAT LITTLE GIRL
    is thirteen and her friends are stick-thin ballerinas with valleys between their hipbones. She is instead developing the wide curves of her mother. She says she is thick but her friends argue that she’s “muscular” and for some reason this hurts worse than just admitting that she jiggles when she walks and she’ll never be a dancer. Eating seconds of anything feels like she’s breaking some unspoken rule. The word “indulgent” starts to go along with “food.”

    A FAT LITTLE GIRL
    is fourteen and she has stopped drinking soda and juice because they bloat you. She always takes the stairs. She fidgets when she has to sit still. Whenever she goes out for ice cream, she leaves half at the bottom - but someone else always leaves more and she feels like she’s falling. She pretends to like salad more than she does. She feels eyes burrowing through her body while she eats lunch. Kate Moss tells her nothing tastes as good as skinny feels, but she just feels like she is wilting.

    A FAT LITTLE GIRL
    is fifteen the first time her father says “you’re getting gaunt.” She rolls her eyes. She eats one meal a day but thinks she stays the same size. Every time she picks up a brownie she thinks of the people she sees on t.v. and every time she has cake, she thinks of the one million magazine articles on restricting calories. She used to have no idea a flat stomach was supposed to be beautiful until she saw advice on how to achieve it. She cuts back on everything. She controls. They tell her she’s getting too thin but she doesn’t believe it.

    A FAT LITTLE GIRL
    is sixteen and tearing herself into shreds in order for a thigh gap big enough to hush the screams in her head. She doesn’t “indulge,” ever. She can’t go out with friends, they expect her to eat. She damns her sweet tooth directly to hell. It’s coffee for breakfast and tea for lunch and if there’s dance that evening, two cups of water and then maybe an apple. She lies all the time until she thinks the words will rot her teeth. She dreams about food when she sleeps. Her aunt begs her to eat anything, even just a small cookie. They say, “One bite won’t make you fat, will it, darling?”

    A FAT LITTLE GIRL
    is seventeen and too sick to go to prom because she can’t stand up for very long. She thinks she wouldn’t look good in a dress anyway. Her nails are blue and not because they are painted. Her hair is too thin to do anything with. She’s tired all the time and always distracted. She once absently mentions the caloric value of grapes to the boy she is with and he looks at her like she’s gone insane and in that moment she realizes most people don’t have numbers constantly scrolling in their heads. She swallows hard and tries to figure out where it all went wrong, why more than a granola bar for a meal makes her feel sick, why she tastes disease and courts with death. She misses sleep. She misses being able to dream. She misses being herself instead of just being empty.

    A FAT LITTLE GIRL
    is twenty and writes poetry and is a healthy weight and still fights down the voices every single day. She puts food in her mouth and sometimes cries about it but more and more often feels good, feels balanced. Her cheeks are pink and they are chubby and soft and no longer growing slight fur. Her hair is long and it is beautiful. She still picks herself apart in the mirror, but she’s starting to get better about it. She wears the dress she likes even if it only fits her in a large and she doesn’t feel like a failure for it. She is falling in love with the fat on her hips.

    She is eating out with friends and not worrying about finding the lowest calorie item on the menu when she hears a mother tell her four year old daughter “You can’t have ice cream, we just had dinner.
    You don’t want to end up as a fat little girl.”

    "
    — Why do we constantly do this to our children? /// r.i.d (via inkskinned)

    (via its-heiress-actually)

     
  2. karenkavett:

    "BUT WHAT ABOUT THE MEN?!" - Is Feminism Sexist? by marinashutup

    This video should be required watching. Just, for everyone.

    (via claudiaboleyn)

     
  3. thisismyaesthetic:

    micdotcom:

    7 dangerous myths about women who wear hijabs

    The hijab is not the most important part of being a Muslim woman, but it is certainly the most visible. In a time when Islamophobia only seems to be on the rise in the West, a practice that is so personal and diverse has become a warped and misunderstood part of a flat and monolithic picture of Muslim women.

    Read more

    That’s riiiight

    (via xekstrin)

     

  4. blindbeards0llux:

    no mom im not a “shrek fan” im a brogre

    (via k-y-h-u)

     
  5. vanshoghta:

    a helpful guide

    (via xuunies)

     
  6. fuckyeahrubyweiss:

    Team RWBY Moodboards: Weiss Schnee

    (via its-heiress-actually)

     
  7. allrightcallmefred:

    fredscience:

    The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

    I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

    Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

    The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

    Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

    I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

    (via hikari-no-hoenhaimu)

     
  8. mxtori:

    businessinsider:

    7 QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK AT THE END OF EVERY JOB INTERVIEW.

    Click here to find out why these questions help you.

    This is so important!

    I never know what to ask and end up looking like a fool cause I don’t have a question prepared.

    Don’t be me.

    (via stoner-blake)

     

  9. aqua-twin:

    "Maybe you’re not [heterosexual/homosexual/some kind of allosexual], maybe you’re just [insert love interests name]-sexual"

    NO, NO THERE IS AN ACTUAL LEGITIMATE NAME FOR THAT

    THERE IS A NAME FOR ONLY BEING ABLE TO FEEL SEXUALLY ATTRACTED TO THOSE YOU HAVE A DEEP EMOTIONAL BOND WITH 

    image

    (via wallace-the-walrus)

     
  10. issu:

    somesickcat:

    No photoshop. Just a kitty with HUGE EYES.

    The lighting in this photograph is amazing~

    (via hikari-no-hoenhaimu)

     

  11. unskinny:

    I hope Miss Claudette is okay.

    (via blangyouredead)

     
  12. smokingkitten:

    sometimes i forget this comic exists and then i find it again and want to happy-cry

    (Source: aeromachia, via stoner-blake)

     
  13. lokicolouredglasses:

    fandom-universe:

    kungfucarrie:

    The most dangerous phrase in the language is, “we’ve always done it this way.”

    "Come on, let’s mix it up!" The heart surgeon says.

    "B-but we’ve always done it this way!" The other replies, "this is how you replace a heart valve."

    "That’s the most dangerous phrase in the human language!" The first surgeon replies haughtily as he inputs a fruit loop into the patient’s heart. "This will be his valve. He will be a fruit loop in a world of Cheerios."

    (taken from this post on the experiments of Harry Harlow)

    This is serious business, because this is a large part of how sexism, racism, homophobia, rape culture, ethnocentrism, etc. continue to happen.

    (Source: uvmsemba, via yuujin1)

     

  14. m-azing:

    its-heiress-actually:

    alexander-the-amazing:

    Imagine if in RWBY during the climatic finale battles they have to fight the bad guys one by one until they reach Cinder. They eventually reach a bad guy who says something like, “The only way I’m going to let you pass is if you can defeat me… IN A DANCE OFF.”
    Everyone is confused, but Jaune’s there like, “My time to shine has come.”

    image

    JOKE’S ON YOU JAIME I HAD REBLOGGED THIS AGES AGO CAUSE THE LIKE HEART WAS STILL RED AHAHAHAHA

     

  15. "

    When her kiss transforms the Beast, she is furious.

    "You should have warned me! Here I was smitten by an exceptional being, and all of a sudden, my fiance becomes an ordinary distinguished young man!"

    "
    — the 1909 play Beauty and the Beast:  Fantasy in Two Acts by Fernand Noziere, the very first published version of the story where the Beauty is disappointed when the Beast transforms into a human at the end. (via corseque)

    (via m-azing)